NAMM 2019 Performance Highlights

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Shawn Stockman

WHAT A SHOW and what an incredible line-up of musicians demonstrate Casio’s new PX-S1000 and PX-S3000. Artists included Steve Weingart with bassist Ben Shepherd, Kristian Terzic, Nick Smith, Darrell Lavigne, Roshon with Patrick Bolton, Anthony Patterson and the one and only Larry Dunn. We even had a special appearance from Shawn Stockman.

 

We have hours of video that we’re still sorting through but we’ll bring you some of the best of the individual performances very soon.

 

 

Casio CT-X3000 and CT-X5000 Differences Explained

While they look similar, there are some significant differences in these two models besides price. In this video, Mike Martin explains nine significant feature differences between the CT-X3000 and CT-X5000.

Don’t have 3 minutes to watch the video? Here are the 9 differences in a nutshell:
  1. Speaker System: The most noticeable difference between CT-X3000 is 12W and the CT-X5000 is an amazing 30W!! 
  2. Battery Power: They both come with power supplies but the CT-X5000 is the only model in the CT-X lineup that can’t run on batteries due to the higher amplification.
  3. User Rhythms:The CT-X3000 has 50 User Rhythms, while the CT-X5000 has 100 User Rhythms. 
  4. Direct Access Category Buttons:The CT-X5000 provides quicker access to tones and rhythms with 16 buttons for direct access to categories.
  5. Connectivity:The CT-X5000 adds 1/4″ Left/Right Line Outputs and a Mic Input with access to the system effects.
  6. Assignable Modulation Button:The CT-X5000 also has an assignable button for tone vibrato or real-time effects control like rotary speaker.
  7. Backlit Registration Buttons:For easier viewing on stage the 8 Registration buttons are backlit on the CT-X5000.
  8. System Effects:The CT-X5000 offers more Reverb, Chorus and Delay choices.
  9. System EQ:They both have EQ presets but the CT-X5000 adds a programmable System EQ.

WE WANT YOU!

Are you a piano or keyboard player? Do you love technology? Are you outgoing and friendly? Casio, a world leader in keyboard instruments, has opportunities for part-time work in several major cities throughout the US.
You’ll be visiting Casio’s network of dealers, training their staff how to effectively demonstrate and sell our keyboards and digital pianos. You’ll also be checking to make sure our products are being displayed properly, conversing with staff and store managers, and reporting back to Casio. We’ll provide you with all the materials you’ll need.
We’re looking for people with:
1. Fluent spoken English, additional languages are a plus
2. Retail sales experience, musical Instrument sales a BIG plus
3. Access to a car (up to 4hr/day travel with mileage reimbursement)
4. Strong communication, presentation, and training skills
5. Keyboard/musician skills preferred
5. A flexible schedule
We’re currently in need of people in these areas:
Minneapolis, Dallas, Austin, Las Vegas, Boston, Denver and Phoenix
If this is you, please record a quick 2-minute video describing why you’d be perfect for the job and send it to artistinquiries@casio.com
We look forward to hearing from you!

Casio’s HexLayer system was originally in Casio’s XW-P1. Since then it has become a more powerful sound shaping tool in the other products like the PX-5S, PX-560 and MZ-X500. So what is it all about?

Simply put, a HexLayer is a single tone with up to 6 layers. Each layer has its choice of waveforms. So you can build a horn section by combining different saxophone, trumpet and trombone layers. Similarly you could create an orchestra by combining strings, clarinet, oboe, french horn, flute and more. Each of the six layers in a HexLayer tone can have their own key range and velocity range so each component doesn’t haven’t be stacked on top of each other, they can be arranged across the range of the keyboard and elements can be triggered only when specific key velocities are reached.

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Synth aficionados take note that the capabilities of a HexLayer tone go far beyond acoustic instrument sounds. In the case of the PX-5S, PX-560 and MZ-X500, each of the six layers have their own pitch envelope, filter type (5 choices), filter envelope and amplitude envelope. So of course you could simply stack 6 sawtooth waveforms for a huge polysynth sound but you can also create much more complex evolving textures using these tools.

The power of HexLayers can also be used to refine and customize keyboard instruments like Wurlitzer and Rhodes electric pianos. PX-560 and MZ-X500 owners, be sure to look through the HexLayer presets where you’ll find electric piano preset that were created using these sound shaping tools. You’ll find that layers can even be programmed to sound on the key release that helps us give some of these the electric piano tones that perfect vintage feel.

Even more amazing is that some instruments allow for multiple HexLayer tones at once! The possibilities are endless.

Stay tuned for an upcoming video on HexLayer programming…
-Mike Martin
Casio America, Inc.

 

HexLayer tones – 6 times the fun

The Definitive PX-5S vs PX-560 Comparison

 

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Just a few months ago the Privia PX-560 was added to Casio’s professional stage piano line up. Since this model is not a replacement for the PX-5S many people have been asking what the real differences are between the two models to find out which one suits their needs.

To make things simple, lets get a few things out of the way that are in common between the two instruments.

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